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Business Insider: ‘90%’ of advertisers are reviewing their programmatic ad contracts as they look for more transparency

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A study from the World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) — a trade body that represents brands such as P&G, L’Oréal, and Emirates — found that nearly 90% of the advertisers it polled are reviewing their programmatic advertising contracts and demanding more control and transparency.

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AdExchanger: WFA Sees Marketers Rethinking Programmatic Strategies With Transparency Top Of Mind

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Marketers across the globe are adapting their relationships with agency trading desks to gain greater transparency into programmatic buys, according to the World Federation of Advertisers (WFA).

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MarTech Advisor: 2017: The Year Transparency Pays Dividends

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Renzo Dipasquale, VP of Enterprise and Self-Serve at AcuityAds discusses how in 2017, transparency will reinvent digital advertising – placing true real-time, data-driven insights at the core of every campaign decision – empowering advertisers and agencies alike to reap benefits. So, what changes can marketers expect the push for transparency to usher in this year?

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Business Insider: Ad Agencies Are Paying Out Secret Settlements So They Don’t Have to Show Clients All Their Contracts

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Media-buying agencies in the US are paying their clients secret multi-million dollar settlements rather than show them all of their contracts and service agreements with media owners.

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Campaign: Should more media owners disclose agency rebates?

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Rebates have been an open secret for years. The payments and discounts that media owners give to agencies in return for certain volumes of spend are a fact of trading life in the UK. But few media owners like to talk about rebates for fear of upsetting agencies. Suddenly, however, the issue is being thrust into the spotlight for two reasons.

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Business Insider: British tabloid The Sun set aside almost $10 million for advertising rebates last year

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News Group Newspapers, which publishes The Sun, has disclosed the amount it sets aside in rebates for its advertisers and their agencies for the first time in its company accounts, Campaign’s Gideon Spanier first reported.

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Digiday: Confessions of a media agency veteran: Hidden programmatic fees ‘must stop’

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While rebates are a known — if controversial — practice in the U.K., hidden fees are different. In the latest installment of the Digiday Confessions series, where we grant anonymity in exchange for candor, a media agency veteran with over three decades of experience in advertising lifts the lid on the murky world of programmatic margins. Pressure from holding companies and clients has lead media agencies in a “downward spiral” to prioritize cost above all else, this person tells us.

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MediaPost: An Educator’s Take On The ANA Media Transparency Report

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Transparency and the media industry aren’t typically synonymous, at least not according to the Association of National Advertisers (ANA). Earlier this year, the ANA released a 58-page report detailing an eight month-long investigation led by K2 Intelligence. The report suggests that unethical practices appear to take place between advertising agencies and their media partners. Following the report, Ebiquitypublished a set of media transparency guidelines for ANA members and the industry. All of this is helpful for those already in the field, but what do these findings and guidelines mean for business schools preparing the next generation of marketers?

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Digiday: Confessions of a Chinese programmatic exec.: ‘Trading desks are 10 times shadier here than in the U.S.’

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If the ad tech market is a mess in the U.S., it is worse in China.

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Forbes.com: How To Make Transparent Marketing A Reality

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In 2016, over $30 billion of media spend was put under review, with a majority of marketers citing transparency as a main reason. Several major agencies were put under legal investigation, and Facebook admitted to substantial errors in several of their metrics that influenced the marketers’ buying behaviors. Large and small brands woke up to realize they’ve been making decisions based on data they cannot trust or truly understand. No wonder the Association of National Advertisers’ “Word of the Year” for 2016 was “transparency.” Moving into 2017, data reporting will continue to be shaken from the ground up, with more investigations and admissions of inaccurate metrics from different distribution channels and even agencies. The industry will become more and more ruthless toward those who’ve either created the mess or turned a blind eye to it. But the real question at the onset of 2017 is: Can this modus operandi really change, and if so, who are the players who can change it and what can they do?

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